2018 TALKS & SPEAKERS

Java, JVM, Javas SE/EE

CI/CD of blockchain smart contracts using Java and eDuke

Level: Intermediate

Blockchain is a hot topic especially the smart contract feature. Smart contracts allow to customize the rules applicable to digital assets deployed on a blockchain. On the Ethereum blockchain, Solidity is the usual programming language used to develop smart contract. With the use of eDuke, a Java framework allowing easy interactions with the Ethereum blockchain, we will show how to continuously deploy and test smart contracts and "oracle" code using JUnit, Jenkins and Maven.


Frédéric Hubin

Frédéric has more than 20 years of experience in programming. He started programming in Java in 1996 while still in College. In 1998, he joined the Swiss Java Center in Zuerich and has been working for Sun Microsystems for a couple of years. Since then, Frédéric has been working for major banks in Europe and currently holds a position as a Senior Java Architect at the financial markets department of ING in Brussels. Frédéric is a blockchain enthusiast and is also working on the concrete application of the blockchain technologies to derivative instruments.


Company: ING
Twitter: @fhubin
Language: English
Blog: Link
Architecture, Performance and Security

Designing Autonomous Teams and Services

Level: Beginner

Autonomy is one of the three psychological needs humans require to feel happy, motivated, and perform our best work. That’s why software teams with high autonomy are happier and more innovative. But achieving high autonomy requires a fundamental rethink to every aspect of organizations - especially the alignment between business strategy, development team boundaries, and software architecture, to enable teams to own problems end-to-end. In this talk, you will see how organizations with high autonomy are at the leading edge of digital product development using continuous discovery and delivery. You’ll see the cultural, organizational, and technical principles that enable high autonomy. You’ll see how to engage your software developers and business stakeholders to collaboratively design organizations and software architecture so teams have high autonomy, enabling them to continuously discover and deliver business value.


Nick Tune

As Principal Engineer at Salesforce, Nick is a strategic technical leader who aligns organisations and software systems by starting with customer needs, focusing on a clear vision of product strategy, and including everyone in a continuous design and delivery process. He co-authored Patterns, Principles and Practices of Domain-Driven Design, and Designing Autonomous Teams and Services.


Company: Salesforce
Twitter: @ntcoding
Language: English
Blog: Link
VenkatSubramaniam
DevOps, Agile, Methodology & Tests

Speed without Discipline: a Recipe for Disaster

Level: Beginner to Novice

The demands on applications have never been more intense. The users on the web, combined with mobile devices, ask for highly responsive applications. Our customers, thanks to open competition and perceived agility, expect tomorrow's features be delivered today. 'Are you done yet' are the dreaded words of the corporate grind. Tools and techniques have risen to address those demands for speed. While that's wonderful, speed in the absence of discipline is hard to sustain. In this keynote we will discuss the practices that can help alleviate the pains while helping us cope with the demands, the reasons to do so, and the approach we can take to achieve that.

Venkat Subramaniam

Dr. Venkat Subramaniam is an award-winning author, founder of Agile Developer, Inc., creator of agilelearner.com, and an instructional professor at the University of Houston. He has trained and mentored thousands of software developers in the US, Canada, Europe, and Asia, and is a regularly-invited speaker at several international conferences. Venkat helps his clients effectively apply and succeed with sustainable agile practices on their software projects. Venkat is a (co)author of multiple technical books, including the 2007 Jolt Productivity award winning book Practices of an Agile Developer. You can find a list of his books at agiledeveloper.com


Company: Agile Developer, Inc.
Twitter: @venkat_s
Language: English
Blog: Link
Java, JVM, Javas SE/EE

Fallacies of Doom - Lessons learned from porting Doom 3 to Java

Level: Intermediate

While Java has grown enormously over the years, the fundamentals have stagnated. The motivation for this talk and underlying project, was the following question: why is Java, with it’s 20 years of age, and (at least)6 billion running JVM’s not major player in the video-game development universe? #####TL;DR; So everybody knows the Doom games, right? Every new installment brought brand new ideas, and groundbreaking graphics. But more importantly, they brought the source code of the prior installment to the public eye. Naturally people have played and hacked the code to oblivion, as much as they played the games themselves. And I have the honor to be one of those people. I (naively) endeavored to port the Doom 3 C++ code to our fantabulous Java. In doing so, I hoped to learn, among other things, more about 3D graphics. ...what I didn't expect though, was for djoom3(cool name huh!) to teach me more about Java!? Aside from the basic game development intro, this talk focuses on the following: - Some areas where Java should learn from it's nemesis, C++ - Other areas where the student(Java) becomes the master(C++) - And some promises that were made, but never kept


Mahmoud Abdelghany

The speaker has been your ordinary consultant for over a decade now. He had/has the privilege of working for numerous industries ranging from airlines to the financial sector. In the rest of his waking hours, he tinkers around with games and emulators. Most recently, he spent about 3 years on the djoom3 project, and reaffirms that he's learned more in those 3 years than his whole career.


Company: Blue4IT
Language: en
Blog: Link
Big Data & Analytics

SparkMLib - what can you do in a week?

Level: Beginner to Novice

Have you ever wondered how hard (or easy) it is to start your Machine Learning project with Spark? Are you concerned about your Math or Machine Learning basic knowledge? Are you worried about lack of experience with Spark? Are you wondering whether a transition from vanilla R to SparkMLib would be hard and what specific benefits you can get? I will share my experience gained from my first week of working with SparkMLib. I will present lessons learned as a Spark expert with just a university background in Machine Learning and solid, although a bit rusty Math. The talk will cover a few examples of using some of the most popular ML algorithms implemented in SparkMLib. It will show not only how you can benefit from distributing the computation using Spark, but also what kind of traps and difficulties might be faced by somebody who is not familiar with Spark or the specific properties of selected algorithms.


Marcin Szymaniuk

Marcin is a Data developer, Data infrastructure administrator and Consultant at TantusData. He has a lot of hands-on experience with technical problems related to Big Data (Clusters with hundreds of nodes) as well as practical knowledge in business data analysis. Companies Marcin has worked for or consulted for include: Spotify, Apple and small startups.


Company: TantusData
Twitter: null
Language: en
Blog: Link

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